Pay-What-You-Want Birthday Sale Results

Last week, to celebrate the one year anniversary of World of Goo’s release, we decided to run a little experiment and for one week, offer World of Goo to the world for whatever price people want to pay for it.  The birthday sale has been a huge success so far, and because of that, we are extending our little experiment/celebration until sunday, October 25.

“Huge success” is a pretty vague term, and we’re not going to leave you hanging.  The purpose of this post is to share the data we’ve collected during the experiment, not do draw conclusions.  This is just one data point about how this kind of pricing methodology can work, and we would need other developers to try it with different games and under different circumstances in order to be able to draw any real conclusions.  One thing we can say for sure, is that a large reason this experiment generated so many sales, is the huge amount of press and blog coverage it got.  We want to thank everyone who bought the game in the last week, and everyone who helped spread the word!

Big Picture

Since the birthday sale started, about 57 thousand people bought World of Goo off our website.  The average price paid for the game was $2.03 a significant percent of which went to PayPal for transaction fees.  Normally, they keep about 5% of the revenue, but because PayPal fees are structured in a way that they take a larger percentage for smaller transactions, we ended up paying over 13% in transaction fees.  For all purchases of around 30 cents and under, we actually saw no money, PayPal took it all, but they probably ended up losing money on most of those transactions ($0.01) as well, they’re not the bad guy.

Here’s a histogram for the amount people chose to pay for the game (click for full size image):

histogram

One interesting thing about the amount people were willing to pay is that it went up as the days went by before leveling off.  Here’s what it looked like:

avgprice

Effect on Other Channels

This one was a big shocker. Steam sales rose 40% relative to the previous week. Our Steam sales tend to fluctuate and it’s not unheard of for there to be a 25% difference from one week to the next (up or down) but the 40% increase came after a week that saw a 25% increase.  It has been several months since we’ve seen this number of sales in a single week on Steam.

The effect wasn’t as dramatic on WiiWare. This week saw a 9% increase in sales over the previous week.  Last week saw a 5% fall, and the week before it saw a 2% rise in sales.  9% seems like it’s large enough to have not been entirely caused by normal fluctuations.

The Survey

A few days into this experiment, we started lamenting the fact that we don’t have more information about how people are choosing a price.  We were getting emails via our contact page from people giving us reasons for why they paid 1 cent, 1 dollar, or 30 dollars, but only a few a day.  We decided to throw up a survey and included a link to it on our “thanks for your purchase” page and in the email that contains the download link.  The survey asked three questions:

  1. How much did the person pay?  This was interesting because we wanted to get a sense for whether the people willing to take the survey represented an accurate cross section of the people who bought the game.  Notice that the results of this question (see link below) are VERY different from the histogram presented above.
  2. How they chose the price?  Some of the options we provided don’t really make a lot of sense as direct answers for this question.  That is because rather than guessing what might motivate people, we simply took the most common reasons people gave us in the explanatory emails they sent and put them in there as answers.
  3. How much do they think the game is worth?  We wanted to see if there’s any correlation between what people think the game is worth and what they’re willing to pay for it.

We haven’t done much analysis on the survey data yet, but we want to make the data available to the public in case anyone wants to look at it more closely.  You can check it out here.  This link will allow you to see the summary, filter the data based on a variety of criteria, and even download the raw survey data to do whatever fancy schmancy analysis you want to do on your own (I’m talking to you, Linux people!)

[Update: we were informed that when downloading or browsing the responses, people’s IP addresses were visible, so we disabled browsing and downloading, but the result summary is still accessible.]

One thing that the survey data might suggests is that despite there being a lot discussion around what games are worth and the dollar value of an hour of play, few people chose their price based on the perceived value of the gameHow much the person feels they can afford seems to play a much larger role in the decision than how much the game is worth.

survey

And with these words, let the birthday celebrations continue!

Thanks again to everyone who bought the game for putting up with our server failures, we’re doing our best to take care of every single one of you.

203 Responses to “Pay-What-You-Want Birthday Sale Results”

  1. Alexander Bruce Says:

    This was a very interesting experiment, and to be quite honest, it’s what made me buy the game. If there was a sale, saying “buy the game for $5″, that still wouldn’t have made me buy it for what I just paid. I was drawn to the offer by the opportunity to buy the game for $0, but it wouldn’t let me do that so I then typed $1 and told people about the chance to buy the game for whatever they wanted to pay. Ultimately, though, I ended up changing my mind and paying $5 for the game. I still haven’t played what I just downloaded, so the cost isn’t relative to that, but the marketing worked in my mind. I’m happy that I got the game for a reasonably price, but not because I wanted the game cheaply. I had no intention of buying it at all, and now I own it. Good work I say!

  2. AdamK Says:

    Could you also disclose coolest ‘Other (please specify)’ reasons for chosing amount paid?

  3. Sam Says:

    Did people answering the survey know their comments would be made public? There are some email addresses in the text fields which it might be polite to scrub.

  4. blankthemuffin Says:

    Interesting data, I’m surprised that so many people paid < $.50, to me you may as well go pirate the game. I paid $10, because I'm a cheap bastard. I bought the game because I like the payment model, and I am determined to support every game which ships native linux binaries, eventually anyway. :)

  5. uberVU - social comments Says:

    Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Hackernews by mahmud: I totaled it up to about ~$100k. Not bad for a few days. I wonder how much of this is total revenue though.2dboy had a strong viral marketing campaign for this game. It’s the only game I have downloaded…

  6. evaisse Says:

    Usefull feedback.

  7. gordon Says:

    I bought a second copy for $3.21, do i get a prize for the most creative price?

  8. Cyber Killer Says:

    I bought the game before the sale started, but if I had the chance I would
    rather pay 5$ instead of 20$, because of the exchange rate from my counties currency to $. In Poland, where I live, for the value of 20$ I could buy most of the big and popular games on the market. World of Goo is normally available in the broken-drm-window$-only-version for ~8$ – a normal price for an indie game here, but I wanted the Linux version, so I ended up paying 3x more, which hurt, as my monthly pay is less than 800$ (and I consider myself having a good paying job, many ppl get only half as much).

    As for how much the game is worth to me… I can buy many good books or movies or games for 8-10$ in Poland, so any other thing (game in ths case) that gives me fun for a couple of hours/days is pretty much worth the same.

  9. Ankh Says:

    I paid $10US before the survey was up. I would’ve done the full $20 to get it on steam (because Steam is awesome) but a) the exchange rate meant I was paying closer to $15 anyway which I figured would be a fair price given this was supposed to be a discount of sorts and I figured most people would go for the cheap option so the more of that goes to you guys, the better. Also I couldn’t afford the whole $30 it would have been at the time

  10. mimox Says:

    I paid full price ($20 iirc) when the game was released for Linux, even after playing through the whole thing during Beta. It’s hard to say if the game is “worth” $20. All I can say is that I enjoyed the game a lot and paying even after playing the beta seemed like the right thing to do (and I absolutely don’t regret it).

    It is unfortunate that a lot of people only payed a few cents. In the future, I would rise the minimum to something that will at least give you a dollar (after covering for transfer costs) if you ever do this again.

    A word about pricing, generally: there is certainly a lower limit that helps triggering a buy without thinking for me. Depending on the game, this lower limit seems to be around $10 for me. For example, buying Caster for $5 was never a question. On the other hand, buying Torchlight for $20 (well, if there _was_ a Linux version…) would also be no question.

  11. Ricardo Carvalho Says:

    I am really surprised that people paid less than $1 for World of Goo, I supported the game, that I bought on Steam some months ago for $5, by paying $10.

  12. Bru Says:

    I was the same – I generally would not have bought the game, even on a $5 sale, but in support of the sales model, payed for it.
    Similarly when bands do this in the music industry I’ll go out of my way to buy. A friend mentioned a site that allowed bands to upload their music for sale in this way, but couldn’t remember the URL and Google won’t help me much :(.

    Cool game, BTW.

  13. John Says:

    Awesome idea — I would be curious about numbers comparing sales under this project to sales trends over the past few months. I have a theory that, in addition to getting people in who otherwise wouldn’t have bought the game but who were made curious and willing to pay through the possibility of paying a low (<$5) price, it would also bring a lot of people out of the woodworks who'd otherwise pirate the game and not bring in any revenue.

  14. Gerd Says:

    Is it really true, that there were 3082 people paying more than $ 10.000 for the game and 4 people paying up to $ 50.000? Great experiment!

  15. Nick Says:

    I played the demo first and liked it, but I didn’t believe it was the kind of game I’d choose to play, since I have some many more waiting in their unopened boxes. Nevertheless I wanted to support the designers of such a well-made game and their initiative with the new payment model. I ended paying 15$ (influenced by the suggested price of 20$ and it’s appeal to my taste) and finishing the game in the very same afternoon. I enjoyed it so vastly, that I was disappointed it didn’t have more chapters. I’m definitely keeping an eye on new releases by 2d-boy :)

  16. mike Says:

    Very, very interesting. Thanks for continuing to post statistics about World of Goo!

  17. ch Says:

    This whole process around Goo is really just amazing. It actually shows the world doesn’t suck as much as it sometimes seems.

  18. googoogoo Says:

    Problem with the survey is, you can’t expect all people to be honest even if the survey is anonymous. I bet that most of the people who are cheap bastards wouldn’t admit it to themselves and wouldn’t even pick “that’s what it’s worth to me”

  19. Phil Newton Says:

    That’s a lot of sales at 1 cent, which is a little depressing. I wonder what effect a minimum threshold would have had. I’m guessing a big draw was the option to pay whatever you want.

    Still, good that so many people get to play it now.

  20. Manu Says:

    I’m very happy you haven’t lost money with the $0.01 transactions :D

    Thanks for sharing the data with us!

  21. Argh Says:

    @blankthemuffin: I’m sure the purpose of this experiment was to make you feel like a better person for paying more than someone else for it. You cheap bastard, you. I didn’t buy the game at all no matter what the price because I didn’t like it. Now you can feel super awesome.

  22. Zach Aysan Says:

    This post is what informed me that you run on Linux. I shall buy your product at the price you ask. Up to me you say? Splendid.

  23. Evden Eve Says:

    Hi .. There are some email addresses in the text fields which it might be polite to scrub…

  24. Jeremy Says:

    Loved the deal. I had actually bought the game on WiiWare previously, but decided to pay the extra $5 to bump the price I paid up to $20 (retail price). Also, I just couldn’t pass up a great game for the linux platform.

  25. appalled Says:

    I’m frankly saddened, though, if i’m honest, not at all surprised, that people really put so very little value on the game. I’d planned to pay the full $20 6 months or so ago but never got around to it, this was a nice reminder and we went with just over a tenner(£) which isn’t actually too far shy of the full amount.

    Being a linux user myself, i’m acutely aware of the lack of industry support and want to make every effort to support developers who produce commercial grade games for the platform(not that free open source titles can’t be of that quality, of course).

    One thing that would be quite interesting to know, from a survey, is the average age of those donating <$5, i wonder if the figures are adversely affected by a lot of kids spending their pocket money.

  26. bayleo Says:

    In response to the survey; I unconsciously consider each game I buy an investment. I’m trading money for leisure activities but each investment carries a risk. World of Goo isn’t the sort of game I typically play, so I considered it higher risk, and as such not worth the initial retail price of $20 (i.e. if I abandon the game after only an hour in frustration, my investment was a poor one). A $5 price point was ideal for my tastes, and I probably would have bitten even if the promotion had been “pay what you want >= $5″.

    It would also be interesting if you guys implemented a sort of falling price point based on week over week volume in the future. In either pricing model I would eventually end up jumping on board.

  27. redhatnation Says:

    The average price was a bit of a shocker! Less than $3 for World of Goo? That’s the sale of the century. Unreal. This is one game that is worth every bit of full price. (I purchased via Steam). Kudos to the developer for allowing the cheap bastards of the world to get in on the action.

    PS: Give Paypal the finger next time so they don’t have their hand so far in your pocket.

  28. josh Says:

    You should read this book: http://www.predictablyirrational.com/

    Here is something to try next time. Suggest a price, any price, but still offer them to choose their price. Whatever price you suggest serves as a relative anchor. Your price above looks like it levels off around $2.50. If you simply suggest that maybe they pay $20, your average price will go up to say $5.00 simply because people feel coming down $15 is a good deal.

  29. ZomBuster Says:

    Not only do you experiment with creating games, you also do so while selling them.

  30. Wendel Says:

    Maybe when saying “pay whatever you want”, they should’ve shown what is the minimun price so that the money goes to 2dboy. Like, “John Doe is a cheap bastard but he wants to give usd 0.01 to 2dboy, how much should he pay to paypal for that ?”

    I’d bet a lot of people paying usd 0.30 didn’t knew it would go to only to paypal because of the fees.

  31. PDB Says:

    Paid $5 to get a copy of WoG for my MacBook, would have paid more except I had already bought a copy from Wiiware at full price.

    Great game, can’t wait to buy it again for my iPhone.

  32. Josh Says:

    Could you breakdown the purchases by OS/platform?

  33. Gen2ly Says:

    Great game. I hadn’t really got to try it so the offer got me into it and I’m glad I did. I couldn’t afford much at the time, but I’ve decided that when I do have the money WoG will be a good Christmas gift.

    Thanks for the game!

  34. swif Says:

    I am no cheap bastard, but I *am* a poor one. However, I am also determined to support every game that ships native Linux binaries, especially ones that are so smooth. The first time I tried World of Goo, I had downloaded the demo on Linux and was completely hooked. Such a wonderful game, and no DRM! And did I mention native Linux binaries!?

    I will, believe it or not, not be able to afford to buy World of Goo for any price I want, not even $0.01. However, I am determined to pay full price for it as soon as I can afford it. Great work, guys.

  35. Ein2015 Says:

    Thank you!

    Myself and my girlfriend (who’s not a huge gamer) have absolutely loved this game. We purchased it when it was full price ($20 I think?) and I think it was worth every penny.

    The largest reasons, other than being hooked in the demo, were that you’re a smaller shop with less sales (meaning each sale means more to you), you have no DRM, and your game works on every OS. Those three combined were absolute gold!

    Please continue to make games like this… I love that I can play WOG on any machine without worry of DRM.

    (P.S. I played it on my Linux box and my gf played it on her Mac.)

  36. Kunkiv Says:

    One of the best game and i like that you support other operating systems like Linux and Mac. I want to see another version og that beatiful game in the future.

  37. a web developer Says:

    Another option would have been to give the buyers a list of pre-selected amounts to choose from…
    First choice: $0.01
    Second choice: $1.00
    …$5.00, 10.00, 15.00, 20.00, 30.00

    No more than 7 choices.

    All on a line.

    This is much more psychologically sound… As anything else creates pauses in the buyer’s mind and leaves him/her with too many choices to select from.

    You would also want to “guide” the buyer to the proper choice (hopefully the $30.00 mark!) by displaying the buy stats in real time and making the average mark stand out from the rest… Buyers will always want to pay you slightly above what the average is, and in turn, take that average up.

    You can also enhance this by giving the buyer something extra at the $30 mark.

  38. imvux Says:

    Reduce your PayPal fees:

    “PayPal offers support for Micropayments to merchants for US to US, GB to GB, AU to AU, and EU to EU transactions for Business and Premier accounts. This feature is offered at a special rate of 5% + $0.05 per transaction.”

    https://www.paypal.com/IntegrationCenter/ic_micropayments.html

  39. Zanz Says:

    Could you publish the names and addresses of everyone who paid 1 cent for the game? I would like to donkeypunch each of them in the gonads.

    Thanks in advance!

  40. imvux Says:

    You can reduce your PayPal fees by making use of PayPal’s micropayment pricing:

    “PayPal offers support for Micropayments to merchants for US to US, GB to GB, AU to AU, and EU to EU transactions for Business and Premier accounts. This feature is offered at a special rate of 5% + $0.05 per transaction.”

    https://www.paypal.com/IntegrationCenter/ic_micropayments.html

  41. anon Says:

    I payed a penny because I knew nothing about the game. Its pretty cool but not my cup o tea. I only played the first few levels though. Had I liked it I probably would have gone back and donated the $10.

  42. Gen2ly Says:

    Well, I got this game and if it wasn’t for the birthday promotion, I’d probably haven’t had tried it. I’m very very glad you did. I wish I could have paid more for it myself it definitely deserves more but I’ve already planned to get this for a relative for Christmas so I hope it makes up for it :).

    Thanks for the great game!

  43. mathew Says:

    If I could Pay What You Want for the WiiWare version, I’d buy it for $5, ’cause I already have the Mac version but would like to be able to play it while slumped on the couch.

  44. reddit Says:

    Well-the-fuck-done dudes!

  45. Salman Says:

    Interesting marketing idea, but maybe you should have gone with a minimum of $1, would be interesting to see how that would effect sales (it would def. effect the viral nature of the idea though).

  46. World of Goo birthday sale deemed ‘huge success’ | Anthonyrobinson.info Says:

    […] Boy seems quite satisfied with the results of its “pay what you want” World of Goo experiment. In celebration of Goo’s first […]

  47. Nitre Says:

    “I love you, 2D Boy.”

    Oh, how true this statement is. You guys are great.

  48. 2D Boy Hits Sales Success with Pay-What-You-Want | Geek Land Says:

    […] Boy recently opened up World of Goo to a pay-what-you-want sale. Today the developer outlined the success of the promotion, and announced that they are extending it to October 25. Since the […]

  49. miko Says:

    Guys, thanks a lot for sharing the detailed results from your “experiment”.
    Very interesting numbers there – most of them rather unexpected (for me, at least).

  50. Jay Says:

    Haha, I bought it and I paid $2.48 because that was all the money I had in my paypal account and none in my linked bank account. After having played the game, I would have been glad to pay you a little more.

  51. John Drinkwater Says:

    Please please please please please please please please please could you bring World of Goo to the PS3?

  52. Marcus Says:

    Everyone who payed a single cent could most probably have afforded to pay $1, you guys and gals should be ashamed. I payed $3 after having played the demo before and deciding I wasn’t that interested. D2D had some major titles up for $5 recently and that was reflected on my decision on how much to pay for WoG. $20 seems way to much for me considering the actual value of entertainment I will get out of WoG (I don’t play games more than say half an hour every month), ten USD seems very resonable considering we don’t have to put up with steam and other sorts of consumer unfriendly measures (hey Dylan F at bestgameever – I want a steam liberated version of audiosurf before I buy it, okay?) plus I love that I can play it in linux.

  53. hypes057 Says:

    I bought the game for a mere $1, I feel real bad about that guys, I know you put a lot of hard work into making these games. Its a very cool experiment though, I doubt many other publishers will follow it even for experimentation purposes – especially the big guns. Imagine if EA said ok…..get _________ semi-current game for what u want to pay for it….It’d be very cool but highly unlikely. Good job anyways, I like the game and if you give the option to donate more after this I will when I get some more funds!

  54. Alejandroe Says:

    Hey guys, thanks for sharing this results. I think that they are VERY interesting. It would be great to know how the thing evolves in other channels (like Steam) in the next weeks.

  55. Buzz Says:

    Interesting data, thanks for publishing it. I can’t believe people went ahead and only paid a penny. I had already bought the game on Steam but went ahead and donated an extra $5 to thank you guys for all the hard work and the fact you’re so customer friendly.

    Hopefully with the extension, and the news coming out, people will pick up a bit and pay some more realistic amounts. ;)

  56. World of Goo’s Pay What You Want Game Pricing: “Huge Success” Says:

    […] results are in, with 2D Boy reporting the endeavor a huge success. So successful, in fact, that they’re continuing the experiment by extending it until this […]

  57. John Evans Says:

    Here’s an interesting story…I bought World of Goo on Steam a while back. My girlfriend played it on my computer and she kinda liked it. Then, last week my girlfriend’s brother posted on his blog talking about this sale…So my girlfriend got reminded about how she liked the game, and she decided to buy it.

    On Steam.

  58. RuberEaglenest Says:

    I’m going to say something maybe someone has already told, but… maybe it could be helpful.

    I think the 1 cent min limit is too low. A lot of people are going to stay with the lowest price they could get (or free), so maybe a better option is to to set 1 dollar as the minimum level. This would allow to get more money; and I’m pretty sure all that cents buyers would glad to pay 1 dollar instead of a cent, if that is the only option; and this would prevent of you and paypal losing money.

    Me myself was going to pay 1 dollar because I have already paid for the Wiiware version, but I changed my mind (the paypal UI doesn’t allow to change the donation amount “on the fly”, one must restart all the buyment process to rise the price if you change your mind), and go up to 1 euro, because 1 dollar seems just toooo low to me. However, right now I can’t afford anything more, but I have 1 spare euro, so, that is.

    Conclusion: 1 Don’t put a price too low so you burn your sales in fees.

    2 While people are proceding with the payment transaction, the desire to rise the price (if it was too low) rises by shame per seconds (so a somewhat non trivial amount of time is desirable for buyers spending in the process). So if paypal would allow to update the desired donation, the final price would rise, maybe some cents or dollars.

  59. puppetmaster Says:

    When you say “you can pay what you want”. My first amount was 1$. Then i read in the text we can pay 0.01$.

    I tell you if you not write 0.01$ in the text you have had more 1$ payment.

    you can explain the 1$ peak with that.

    (sorry, bad english, i now)

  60. elmindreda Says:

    Lovely game. Glad to see your experiment turned out so well. Hope more developers try this.

    Paid $5 for it this time, partly to support the idea and partly to get the Linux binaries, but had already paid full price for it on Steam when it was new.

  61. RuberEaglenest Says:

    I’m going to say something maybe someone has already told, but… maybe it wouldbe helpful.

    I think the 1 cent min limit is too low. A lot of people are going to stay with the lowest price they could get (or free), so maybe a better option is to to set 1 dollar as the minimum level. This would allow to get more money; and I’m pretty sure all that cents buyers would glad to pay 1 dollar instead of a cent, if that is the only option; and this would prevent of you and paypal losing money.

    Me myself was going to pay 1 dollar because I have already paid for the Wiiware version, but I changed my mind (the paypal UI doesn’t allow to change the donation amount “on the fly”, one must restart all the buyment process to rise the price if you change your mind), and go up to 1 euro, because 1 dollar seems just toooo low to me. However, right now I can’t afford anything more, but I have 1 spare euro, so, that is.

    Conclusion: 1 Don’t put a price too low so you burn your sales in fees.

    2 While people are proceding with the payment transaction, the desire to rise the price (if it was too low) rises by shame per seconds (so a somewhat non trivial amount of time is desirable for buyers spending in the process). So if paypal would allow to update the desired donation, the final price would rise, maybe some cents or dollars.

  62. Marvin Says:

    I don’t even know what World of Goo is and I still find this interesting. I’m not sure about the “pay what you want” model really… as far as a long term solution – I don’t think it is. Because eventually the novelty will wear off. I doubt Radiohead will release their next album in that manner.

  63. Nic Freed Says:

    Just a quick question, what was the biggest amount anybody payed? Did they get a prize?

  64. World of Goo promotion a success because of Gamer Limit | Gamer Limit Says:

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  65. World of Goo Name-Your-Own-Price Sale a “Huge Success” | Crush! Frag! Destroy! Says:

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  66. Sebastian Wolff Says:

    $0.01? Really?

    Interesting experiment though, either way.

  67. Matt L Says:

    I love how people are getting all worked up and angry at anyone who paid .01 cent for the game.

    First of all, I’ve now purchased the game three times. Once on my Wii back at launch. Once during the sale for 5$ to give to my brother for his birthday. And then one more time for 3$ just because I wanted a copy for my PC.

    So I’m not among the 1 cent crowd, but stop getting all angry about it. It’s stupid. The game was on sale and people chose to purchase it for the cheapest sale price available. I’m sure most didn’t know that 2D boy wouldn’t see anything from it, but more importantly 2Dboy could easily have made it impossible to purchase for less than would give them a profit.

    People who paid only one cent bought the game fair and square for a price that the developer of the game said was acceptable. They didn’t steal it. They didn’t do anything wrong. So stop talking about donkey punching and how outraged you are and whatever else. It’s just silly. Well, I think it is at least.

  68. Radiohead model applied to World Of Goo « Mostly Tigerproof Says:

    […] a promotion where customers could name their own price for the game. They’ve released a ton of information about how much people paid and why they chose the price they did. There are two datasets, 57,076 […]

  69. Craig Timpany Says:

    If anyone’s interested, I downloaded the survey results and made some graphs showing which reasons people use at different price points, and also what kind of correlation there is between what people think it’s worth and what they actually paid.

    http://blog.mostlytigerproof.com/2009/10/21/radiohead-model-applied-to-world-of-goo/

  70. b0rsuk Says:

    I have an idea.

    The game should have very low price, just enough to get some decent profit without PayPal getting 98% of a sale. I’d say 1, 2 or 3 dollars. BUT, at the same time, ALLOW PEOPLE TO PAY MORE than that. Remove the upper ceiling. People who won’t pay such low price probably aren’t going to pay anyway. But some people may be feeling generous – let them.

  71. moromete Says:

    This suggestion is worthwhile: “Here is something to try next time. Suggest a price, any price, but still offer them to choose their price. Whatever price you suggest serves as a relative anchor. Your price above looks like it levels off around $2.50. If you simply suggest that maybe they pay $20, your average price will go up to say $5.00 simply because people feel coming down $15 is a good deal”.

    But you should also consider asking the question about worth before the actual sales process. If the customer settles on a price and declares a worth to himself and an outside source it is more likely that he will actually pay that price when asked for it in a real transaction.

  72. World of Goo Turns 1: “Pay whatever you think it’s worth” this week « Limulus Says:

    […] The sale has been held over until Oct. […]

  73. Noxn Says:

    Im 15 and my “Attention span” or whatever is really small.
    I didnt want to waste that much money (20$) on a game I probably wont play for long.
    (After all, thats all the money ive got)
    So I paid 8 bucks when this birthday sale came around. (Thats the amount i thought it was worth.)

    I already played everything thru, and it was worth the 8 bucks.

  74. Peter Says:

    The day I hear this game is released as Free/Open Source software, I will gladly fork over 15 or 20 dollars for a copy. Until then, I won’t pay for it – even if I can get it for $0.01

  75. Teddie Says:

    @redhatnation

    Games are only worth what the person is prepared to pay for them, that is how the free market works. While you may think World of goo is $20, there are games with million dollar budgets selling for $5-10 in the bargain bin, world of goo is up against those bargin bin games of AAA development teams.

    Developers tend to forget that their games are competing against all the other games that have been released over the last 5-10 years and whom many people have not yet gotten around to playing.

  76. Bassist643 Says:

    I think I solidified the best price payed with an even $Pi. $3.14 on the dot, no rounding needed :-p

  77. LC Says:

    Additionally to the micropayments stuff, I hope that you applied to the lowered fee rates for a year now : https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_display-receiving-fees-outside&countries=

    I worked at PayPal two years ago and I was astonished that most business did not know about these lowered fee rates and some was losing lots of money because it’s not automatic : you have to applied the first time you are elligible for them.

    Always thought it was a bad move by PayPal to not communicate more on that (as for the micropayments …).

    Moreover I think you should have put a minimum price of 1$ and I consider $0.01 as some kind of an insult …

  78. Brian Says:

    I tried to buy this for $15, but I’m out of country and the paypal flagged my account as compromised.

    I have no problem paying this much for it. The game seems pretty clever and is well done. I’m extremely pleased that they have a linux release for it (and in part a reason why I don’t mind the $15).

  79. Mentil Says:

    The popularity of World of Goo and the amount of press it has received has, I think, skewed the statistics for this experiment and affected its generalizability. Just reading these comments, it’s obvious that many people had heard of the game previously but never tried it. Since they had no idea if they would enjoy it, they were less likely to commit a significant amount of money. For a game that gets no press, but has a pay-what-you-like option that a player makes use of after concluding a demo that they enjoy, I suspect the player would offer a significantly higher amount. In discussions on WoG, it’s surprising how many players of the full version didn’t realize there was a demo, it must be discreet or something.

  80. Anton Says:

    Thank you for the flexible price, you’ve just made me pay $5 and I’m happy.
    I would never pay $20 because I’m cheap, even your truly deserve it. I love Linux version, it run very smoothly. I spent one night playing in it. It really made with love. Hope you’ll have enough money(motivation) to keep your talent running.

  81. Eruonen Says:

    I love you guys, this is a great experiment.

  82. Limulus Says:

    I sent in an e-mail with an idea, but I haven’t heard back, so I’ll just leave a note here and see what people think:

    Basically, Linux is very cool, but suffers from a lack of high-quality games. WoG is a high-quality game available for Linux, but is neither “free” in either the gratis or libre senses of the word and so can’t get redistributed in the ‘brain dead easy’ repository systems that makes distros like Ubuntu a joy to install programs on. WoG’s sales (quantity multiplied by price) will end up declining over time. Thus, it should be possible to figure out how much $ it would take now to make WoG gratis (think area under a curve) for Linux in the future. And I would like to help raise funds for that :)

    The thought of a worldofgoo package in Ubuntu’s multiverse repository for the LTS release that’s due in April is so neat! Open sourcing it would be even better, but probably a lot more $$$ and later in the future, ne? So baby steps first…

    How about this for a price suggestion:

    181/4830 responses in the survey mentioned Linux (177) or Ubuntu
    There were ~57K purchases, so >2K of those were likely for Linux
    The average price seemed to plateau around $2.50
    So the Linux share of $ was probably on the order of >$5K
    Thus >$250K/yr assuming continued sales at that level.

    For the sake of argument let’s say that sales for the Linux port will drop by half every year:

    2009: 250K, 2010: 125K, 2011: 62.5K, 2012: 31.25K…

    the sum of that series would have a limit of $500K.

    If we raised $500K, would 2D Boy make WoG for Linux gratis? :)

  83. Thomas Wrobel Says:

    Its a great experiment.
    For charging prices under 30cents though, you should use these guys;
    http://www.iCents.com
    They claim to have a microtransaction system that lets you charge as low as 1cent and still see part of the money from that cent.
    (obviously, you dont get money per-cent, its buffered, but it should still be usefull for anyone looking to charge very small fees)

  84. A potential player Says:

    So, I was one of those who only paid $1. My reason is that I’m treating it just like a demo version of the game.

    A week after downloading it, I’ve not even installed the game and probably won’t get chance to for another couple of weeks. When I do get round to playing it, one of two things will happen – I’ll either be bored of it within 10 minutes, in which case $1 is fair, or I’ll really love it, in which case I’ll buy it again for $20.

  85. kris Says:

    you guys should look at setting up a “micropayments” paypal account to receive payments under about $12.

  86. Joey Says:

    Great experiment!

    I bought World of Goo back in December for WiiWare, so it didn’t even occur to me to buy a PC version for a cheap price now. I think the €20 (=$30) (Wii points can only be bought in sets of 2000 :( ) I paid for it was a tad steep for the game, but the whole World of Goo process has definitely been worth that much to me. The guts you guys are displaying with experiments like these are worth more to me than most games are!

  87. BikeHelmet Says:

    Your survey wasn’t up long enough. I’m another buyer that sent in $2 to get the non-steam Linux version. I know one friend did as well, and he didn’t mention a survey either.

    Glad to hear it paid off, though – looks like Paypal will be happy! :P

  88. Großer Erfolg für World of Goo » F!XMBR Says:

    […] wurde also dazu aufgerufen, das Spiel zu kaufen, den Preis sollte dabei der Käufer bestimmen. Die Aktion wurde zu einem großen Erfolg. Über 57.000 Käufer hat World of Goo an Land gezogen, der durchschnittliche Preis, […]

  89. proppy Says:

    Hi,

    Thanks for sharing the data :)

    I’m curious what the results would have been, if asking for payment *after* the download of the game has started.

  90. Tobias Says:

    I only payed $14 and I felt bad afterwards for being so cheap.
    Now when seeing the numbers I still feel bad, but not for the same reason. Come on people how could you only pay $0.01?

  91. solidox Says:

    You rock so hard! This is the future of e-goods commerce, and also the solution for a better world; greed makes more greed, selflessness is just awesome :) cheers

  92. sim Says:

    Great work guys, as always.

    Really interesting experiment. I was thinking about all the people that paid $0.01.

    I reckon because you asked people to pay what they thought it was worth they just paid the $0.01 with the initial urge to be a cheap git, but maybe a large percentage of that group after playing the game feel really bad for only paying $0.01.

    So a WOG guilt is sweeping the nation.

  93. Aze Says:

    I only paid $0.01 because i already own the wii version. and i don’t have a job.
    I do enjoy the game so Thank You!

  94. DamageInc Says:

    I brought the game shortly after launch on steam for full price, and got addicted.

    Shortly after I started installing the demo far and wide, how wide? I am a windows OEM for a business that sells about 2-3 PCs a day, they all get world of goo demo on the desktop (installed, thanks for the silent install option), started about 8 months ago… about 500 demo installs so far and just started it integrating into our windows7 installer :)

    Btw, to truely get to love this game, play it on a tablet PC, the pen input just makes it 10000x better.

    So happy birthday World of Goo, and heres to installing another half a thousand demos on peoples PCs.

  95. World of Goo Geburtstagsaktion « gefangen im netz Says:

    […] auch Experiment genannt, wurde jetzt bis zum nächsten Sonntag, 25.10., verlängt (http://2dboy.com/2009/10/19/birthday-sale-results/). Wer also noch ein schönes Knobelspiel für das Geld haben möchte, was es ihm wert […]

  96. Devin Says:

    I think the problem with posting a minimum price is that people then psychologically see this minimum as an acceptable and “fair for the developer” base price. If the minimum is free, people realize that by taking advantage of this minimum they are providing no compensation to the developer at all and may choose a higher price. Sure, enforcing a 1 dollar minimum would remove the 0.10 buyers, but I feel it would have an adverse effect on the percentage of people who paid higher prices for the product.

  97. WiiGamer » Blog Archive » 2D Boy Hits Sales Success with Pay-What-You-Want Says:

    […] Boy recently opened up World of Goo to a pay-what-you-want sale. Today the developer outlined the success of the promotion, and announced that they are extending it to October 25. Since the […]

  98. Ryan Says:

    I paid $0.01. Why? well several reasons:

    1) I don’t normally play indie games at all so was reluctant to pay for anything I wouldn’t play.

    2) I only found out about the promo on the day and thought that it was only for the day, so didn’t download the demo 1st to see if it was a game I would want so to me $0.01 was nothing to lose if it turned out the game was complete rubbish.

    3) I didn’t really read the site and never realised the game was cross platform. Had I realised that there was a linux version as well at the time of purchase I would have paid $2-5 quite happily mostly to encourage cross platform development.

    To those that say $0.01 is an insult and blah blah blah I have to point out other than the Gold master software has NO value. The 1st disc is worth all the R&D costs but other than that there is no over head. Software is priced purely on what people will pay as unlike, say car manufacturing, there is no base cost for materials etc. Once the code is written and released each copy is free to make. Once the R&D costs have been recouped then the software becomes 100% profit.

    So congradulations. You made $0.01 out of me, which is something and it is more that you would have ever got had you not had the promo. You also have the fact you are now on my radar so to speak which means when/if you release games in the future then I am more likely to look closely at them and not dismiss them out of hand as would have happened up till I bought and played World of Goo.

  99. jim Says:

    TPB just put out a movie called, “Nasty Old People” via donation-pay. They only received US$3,000 so far. I think the future will remain “fixed price”. These experiments are fun, but unprofitable (other than a hype factor).

  100. Serg Says:

    Could you share a more detailed information about Linux version sales?

  101. World of Goo: Pay what you want Says:

    […] L’intérêt est dans le fait qu’ils ont partagé avec nous les statistiques de cette expérience de vente sur leur blog. Très […]

  102. World of Goo Geburtstagsaktion Says:

    […] Der normale Preis des Spiels liegt bei 20$. Eine ausführliche Auswertung der Statistik findet ihr auf dieser Seite. Aufgrund der hohen Resonanz wurde die Aktion, die eigentlich am letzten Sonntag endete, bis zum […]

  103. Anon Says:

    Heh, I think if some paypal haters know that buying it for 0.01 will hurt paypal and not 2dboy, they might buy very many copies at 0.01, and maybe another bunch at 0.31 or so to pass some money to 2dboy.

  104. PawelPlociennik Says:

    Could you guys show us a histogram of a payments for a various an operation systems (windows, mac, linux).
    This could be very interesting I think.

  105. greedyzebra Says:

    It would be interesting to see how many folks might in the future donate again if given the opportunity. I’d be very inclined to pay, say, $1 for a game/program initially then, if the program suited my needs/was a fun game to play, I could see coming back again and donating a larger amount. If finances didn’t allow a big ($20) donation, I might be inclined to make such a donation over time (say, $5 at a time).

  106. Niraj Says:

    Just found out about this via Slashdot, so I’m very happy the deal has been extended. I loved this game when I got it on WiiWare, and now I can get the PC version without spending another $20! Brilliant!

  107. hikaricore Says:

    I’d only played the demo up until last week however when the special came up I couldn’t resist spending $1 which in all honesty was all I had after paying bills and buying groceries. I know it’s not much but if I get a little more money before this thing is over perhaps I’ll buy it again for my mom or something. :)

  108. JustinGordon Says:

    I was wondering what the minimum purchase was in order for you guys to make any money off it. $0.50? I’m just curious because this is the first time any body has done a thing like this and been so open about the results.

  109. Nilson Says:

    I bought the game on Steam a while back and now bought it again to support the developers and, as a bonus, get Linux and Mac versions. I paid only $4, though.

    I’d suggest a minimum amount of $1. Most people who bought at $0.01 would have bought at $1 (since they already have a funded PayPal account and/or credit card) and you would actually get some money from them, instead of wasting everything on PayPal fees.

    Finally, although I personally love sales, I never buy games when they’re first released anymore as you always get a better price on Steam if you wait ~1-2 months. So you should consider this fact, as I know other people who do the same and other people are probably getting aware of this fact.

  110. BrokenBrake Says:

    Thank! Very Interesting.

    My related experiments (results & analytics):
    http://brokenbrake.biz/2008/01/02/blog-post.html
    http://brokenbrake.biz/2009/10/11/microtodo-profit

    Sorry, i don`t speak english.
    RadioHead Forever :)

  111. Yuriy Says:

    Great game! TBO I played an “free” copy and I liked it so much I wanted to thank you for what you guys did, but $20 was too much for me. I was very happy I finally could support your talent thanks to this sale. I paid $5.

  112. World of Goo: Das zahlten die Spieler | Scatterd Says:

    […] Ergebnisse, optisch aufbereitet, könnt ihr auf dem Blog von 2D Boy […]

  113. BrokenBrake Says:

    Is it possible to do the same statistics by country? You can find out what nationality the most generous and vice versa:) It would be very interesting.

    P.S. Otmoderiruyte my previous comment, please.

    Google Translate, sorry.

  114. Jason Says:

    One thing that may have affected the results is that this was very popular on sites like Fatwallet. Users there had previously noticed the game on clearance at Target for about $3, so that clearance price influenced a lot of buyers.

  115. Anonymous Says:

    […] […]

  116. meneame.net Says:

    Como ganar más de 67 000 euros en una semana: resultados de la venta WORLD of GOO a 1 centimo…

    La última semana, para celebrar un año de del aniversario de la salida de Wolrd of Goo, decidimos hacer un pequeño experimento durante una semana, ofrecer World of Goo al mundo por cualquier precio que la gente quisiera pagarlo…….

  117. onigiri Says:

    @Gerd: In the USA, the “.” is a decimal point. “Ten thousand dollars” is $10,000.00 in US notation. So the chart shows 3082 people paying over ten dollars, and four people paying fifty dollars.

  118. Andrew Says:

    I wish I could have participated in the survey. I paid .01 for the game because I saw the sale on Kotaku. I never heard of World of Goo and because of that I was reluctant on paying a lot for a game I’ve never heard of. After spending a majority of my weekend on this game. I’d be happy to pay $5 or $10 for World of Goo 2. I’m sad to find out that the super low transactions didn’t generate any fund for 2D Boy or even Paypal. (wish I knew that sooner)
    Thanks 2D Boy for your generosity!

  119. Vince Says:

    That’s all very faskinationish!

  120. Sina Says:

    Gave you 25 dollars for it (i think it deserves more though). Now I hope to see more great games from you guys/

  121. Ryan Mytton Says:

    I feel terrible that I bought it for only a mere cent… I’m sorry about that, especially since it is such a great game.

  122. Thoughts of a Game Developer » World of Goo, Pay What You Want Says:

    […] you want for the game (minimum of 1 cent). They also asked people why they paid what they did, and released statistics on how much people […]

  123. Nick Says:

    I bought 7 copies for me and my friends, $5 each.
    The reasoning is as follows: my friends are Linux users from Russia and they would certainly have bought the game themselves (they were extremely happy when I offered to buy it for them), but — alas—- they have plastic cards that cannot be used online (e.g. visa electron). So I emulated them and paid in their stead the amount of money that is (from my point of view) a normal price for a game for a Russian customer. Or, in other terms, Russians would find 5$ an absolutely legit price and gladly pay it right away(on the contrary, 20$ is ‘a bit too much’). For comparison: when I bought an official DVD of Enemy Territory: Quake Wars, it was around 7$ (a year ago).

  124. Xanday Says:

    Thanks for the data :)

  125. Somian Says:

    great idea. i already bought world of goo on steam, but now I got it again for $0.01 for my mac. Would have paid more, but i already paid more for the steam version, so i took the chance to grab the version for my macbook pro :>

    however, http://www.paythegame.net is still the ultimate pay-what-you-want “game” :>

    life is an online game and this is the highscore list.

  126. Jeff Says:

    Without trying the game, I don’t know what it’s really worth. I paid $0.01 because free was not an option. Once I get a chance to try it, if I love it then I’d be willing to pay a couple bucks. That would be an interesting experiment: ask for donations after the user plays it instead of before. Revive shareware!

  127. Mustang Says:

    I think a great idea would be to show the average price of the last 1000 purchasers to a person about to buy themselves.

  128. Customers Care: The Radiohead Strategy that Worked with 2D Boy « Vagrant Bard Says:

    […] response came through statistics released by 2D Boy via surveys and interestingly revealed that though consumers do care about those developers, publishers (not so […]

  129. Lessons From Pay-What-You-Wish Gaming | Technologizer Says:

    […] Boy has now shared the sales figures, the range of prices paid, and the results of a buyer survey. Media buzz and word of mouth gave […]

  130. dontgetit Says:

    Why are there these people explaining that they’re hesitant to pay more than $0.01 for a game they haven’t tried, and that’s their reason for not spending any more, when there’s a perfectly good first-chapter-of-the-game-free type demo available for download?
    You could have played the demo without even bothering to log into paypal, then decided whether the experience was compelling enough to pay for another however many chapters.

  131. World Of Goo publishers release results | appsocial Says:

    […] Boy, publishers of innovative indie game World of Goo have released the results of their week-long first birthday pricing experiment, where they asked customers to pay exactly as […]

  132. BlogLESS : Four Design Links: October 22, 2009 Says:

    […] Boy posted an analysis of their data from the sale, along with a qualitative survey. While the largest percentage of […]

  133. Pay-what-you-want marketing experiment « enVanna Says:

    […] pay what you want, Steam, video games, World of Goo Indie game developer 2D Boy just made an interesting experiment, in which they sold their game World of Goo for whatever price you were willing to […]

  134. Sean P. Says:

    Wow, thanks guys, paid a good $5 for it. Definitely keeping an eye on 2dboy from now on. (for your games, not promotions)

  135. el-cheapo Says:

    Cheapo here, just paid $10 for the game. Not my cup of tea but anything to bring more games for linux..

  136. World of Goo costs whatever you want for 1st year anniv! | Elonian Nomad: 3rd Strike Says:

    […] actually pay when they’re allowed to set their own price?  2DBoy was cool enough to give that info too!  […]

  137. Arthur Protasio Says:

    Thank you for experimenting Ron and Kyle!

    There are ways of achieving success other than the traditional business models and if treated with respect, customers will show they care. :)

    http://vagrantbard.com/2009/10/21/customers-care-the-radiohead-strategy-that-worked-with-2d-boy/

    Hope the word of mouth helps!

  138. Gijs Says:

    Well that sounds lovely!
    However I still havent got my download thingy (no not even in the spam folder) for my donation :<

  139. đª]V[ªX » World Of Goo verkauft sich FUCKIN’ brilliant Says:

    […] 50.000.000² Dollar bezahlen, was man wollte. 2D Boy sind cool genug, das Ergebnis des Experiments zu veröffentlichen. Tja, was kam dabei wohl heraus? In einer Woche machten 2D Boy mehr als 100.000$ Umsatz mit dieser […]

  140. Blacksad75 Says:

    I personally paid 8$ because I already purchased the game on Wii. Like some people said, minimum price should have been 1$. The 16852 people who bought the game for 0,01$ should be ashamed. Even the worst game deserves more than one penny. And as World of goo is one the better PC game i know, people should at least give 1$. Now that you spend 1 penny (“that’s all I can afford”, hahaha) go buy your fucking 70$ Halo 3.

  141. daMax Says:

    Congratulations! I bought WOG a year ago but I still love it a lot. You guys are so cool! Keep up the good work!

  142. Pay what you want for World of Goo on PC until October 25. Coming to iPhone soon - Video Games Blogger Says:

    […] really interesting is the World of Goo Pay What You Want sales data, and how the developer was able to make over $100,000 dollars in sales! That’s money they […]

  143. Indie Vault » 2D Boy e le vendite di World of Goo Says:

    […] del liceo; è tempo di tirare le somme per i ragazzi di 2D Boy a seguito dell’offerta “Pay What You Want For World of Goo“, che ha consentito a tutti di scaricare il gioco in cambio di una donanazione anche […]

  144. Some Dude Says:

    “Pay what you want” works. “Pay this price, but more if you feel generous”, not so much.

    17 thousand people paying one cent, at 30 cents per transaction, is around $5000. The sale has earned, apparantly, over $100 thousand. There’s not many other industries where you can spend $5000 on marketing and make that much of a profit at all, yet alone in such a short time

    They may be cheap bastards, but if you think of them as a marketing expense, it makes a lot of sense. All of the suggestions of how to get more money out of those people ignore the fact that doing so would have reduced the number of them that bothered at all, and also reduced the number of other people who would have paid above the average. Fine, they’re the worst scum ever and everyone needs to express outrage – the real trick is in making them pay more without severely reducing the income from all the other people.

    (Personally I paid nothing, because I’m too slack to get around to playing the game. But the concept is still fascinating.)

  145. Stephen Says:

    I bought it for 10 dollars, and enjoyed it so much that I feel it deserves more, and will donate again. I think all of the “risk” comments under the “other” choice betray people’s feelings well — they don’t want to pay a lot for a game they don’t know if they’ll enjoy. I think if a “play then pay” system was ever set up for something similar to this, it would be fairly successful, for all the reasons this was successful.

  146. av8r0023 Says:

    I paid 10 USD. I wasn’t planning on buying it until I read that it runs natively on Linux and also has no DRM, so I figured I’d give it a shot. I support game development by voting with my dollars.

  147. Game Theory and Game Sales « Life as Clay Says:

    […] far more than they see in a standard week. They analyzed the purchasing and user motivations in a detailed blog post that is worth reading. I paid full price for the game when it was released and I would be happy to […]

  148. NLi10 Says:

    I paid $3 and $2 as I know I won’t play it much but wanted to cover costs and show support.

    I had planned to buy the Wii version originally but life overtook me and I knew I would have no time to play it. I’m on the 5th stage or so on the Mac version after 3 play sessions as I have to fit it in when not working or doing other things.

    It’s a very good game of a style which would be great as a DL game on the DSi.

    I do feel a minimum of say $0.20 (or whatever covers basic fees for each transaction) would have been acceptable, but a less true experiment.

    Congrats to you all.

  149. WiiGamer » Blog Archive » 2D Boy Birthday Sale Results Says:

    […] October 25th. Yes, that’s right, you can still buy the game for whatever price you want. Head over here to check out some more statistics of the sale, or here to buy the game. (Note: This sale does not […]

  150. ReyBrujo Says:

    Bought the Linux version for $5, since the demo was incredibly fun at work. The statistics today say people “like the pay-what-you-want model and want to support it” over “that’s all I can afford right now” that was the primary reason back when this blog post was made. Reading the “other” reasons, many say “I don’t know/haven’t played the game, but want to support the model”. Can a developer live with only donations? Not sure, but I really hope 2dboys can (and keep supporting WiiWare!).

  151. News: Name your price for World of Goo :How To Play Warhammer Online Says:

    […] can check out the results on their site, but here’s a peek at what they’ve been getting as average payment amounts. There have […]

  152. CraigZ Says:

    thank you, 2D boy! thank you for giving me a chance to judge the game that I am going to buy! I paid $9 for this game, because this isn’t the game I want, but because of your kindness, I decided that I have to buy this game.

    once again, thank you!

  153. Lia Says:

    Hmm…interesting idea. You probably don’t want to read my comment because it doesn’t really count. I came to this page after I read online that I could set my own price but after viewing a demo, I don’t think this is a game for me. I don’t understand it. I was very lured by the idea of paying $1 or $2 but would have paid probably $10 (otherwise would have felt guilty) if I really did want the game. That sucks that people paid less than $.50. Maybe you should do a $5 minimum next time. You may also want to come up with a better demo video for people (idiots) like me that will interest me in the game while explaining it better.

  154. Stephan Reiter Says:

    I bought it for 10 USD and I’m thinking about getting another copy as a gift for a friend. A major plus point in my opinion is that you can get the game for *the* three platforms, Windows, Mac, and Linux. This game is in fact the first I bought for my Mac. No DRM? Second plus point in my book. Great job!

  155. James Prankard Says:

    Thanks for this.
    I took this opportunity to buy this for my dad.
    He’s not an avid gamer and I think that this game can show him that there are good/fun/unique games that are really worth playing.

  156. World of Goo Birthday Sale « psykus.domain Says:

    […] So if you’re interested in the game at all, I would urge you to buy the game from them by tomorrow, and also fill out their survey on the sale that appears after you purchase the game. One thing to note, due to PayPal fees, if you donate 30 cents or less, 2D Boy doesn’t see any of it, PayPal ends up keeping it all, as detailed here […]

  157. 2dboy Extending Pay-What-You-Want Celebration & Results | Latest PC, Console, Video Games, News and Reviews Says:

    […] out their site Here for the rest of the data and also if you haven’t picked up the game. Share and […]

  158. Eyrie Says:

    I paid $1. $20 is really meaning a lot to me.

  159. winnie Says:

    Able to extend the offer?! >.<

    i tot it's over on the 19th!! and thought was rather hopeless to get the game alreadY!! UNTIL NOW!! T_T

  160. Dan Says:

    My guess is that many people that paid 0.01$ were just curious, they didn’t bother try the demo before buying
    In fact why try the demo if you can get the game for next to nothing?
    If you liked the game you didn’t even need the effort to uninstall the demo and start again the full game!
    I’m sure that many people out there ended up loving the game and feeling guilty for paying so little for it :)
    So in my opinion it would be better to choose from a set of price option , like : 1 – 2 – 5 -10$ …

  161. Resumen de la semana (19-25/10/2009) | VideoShock Says:

    […] El experimento de World of Goo ha sido un éxito. La idea de poner el juego al precio que cada uno quiera pagar ha resultado en 57.000 descargas y 100.000$ de beneficio para el creador, lo cual no está nada mal. Otro resultado interesante que se desprende del experimento es que la gente ha pagado en relación al dinero que tenía disponible y no tanto según la calidad que le reconocían al juego. Os recomendamos el análisis que han realizado en Rock, Paper, Shotgun sobre el asunto. Tal vez con este sistema de pago Q-Games, autores de Pixel Junk, no tendrían que abandonar la PSP a causa de la piratería. La libertad de elección es buena […]

  162. Karl Says:

    Very interesting!

    I played a torrent version of this for some time but chose to buy a legitimate version through Steam many months ago in order to support the developers for an excellent game.

    FWIW, I do this with all types of software, thus implementing my own “Pay if it is worth it” system for software. Strange to say, but I feel this is a more ethical/balanced system than either the “up front purchase” or “steal it” extremes. I apply the same philosophy to freeware with donate screens. The attitude of the company supplying the software is a big factor in this.

  163. debcha Says:

    I replotted the distribution data to show how much revenue came in at each price point (because one person who pays $1 is ‘worth’ 100 who pay a penny). The histogram spikes at $5, with shorter peaks at $1 and $10. You can see the plot and my analysis here. Thanks for making the data available!

  164. World of Goo – When Free Pays « Avoiding the Performance Trap Says:

    […] to name their own price to download the studio’s popular PC game, World of Goo. This week, 2D Boy announced the results, calling it “a huge success.” As a result, 2D Boy extended to promotion through to the […]

  165. World of Goo(d) (part2) Says:

    […] the authors noticed is the fact people gave a little more money the day after they published their first results. If we don’t allow the randomness factor in this change, we can believe people felt guilty […]

  166. Lia Says:

    I first commented above @ Lia UNITED STATES Says: October 23rd, 2009 at 9:02 pm

    Then I came back again to check out the game because I was really curious as to why it’s got such good reviews and I found a demo copy to play and learn. It is fun. I played a little bit of CH1 and then bought the game for only $2 because that’s all I can afford now. A couple of days ago I would have paid $10. If I ever play the game again for long periods of time, then I would like to “donate” again to make up for paying only $2. I think you guys should set up a link off your blog where people who already paid for the birthday sale can donate more $ in the future if they are really playing the game and feeling guilty and want to pay more.

  167. Paari Says:

    I am one of the many that payed 0.01 cents. Now having played the game I am ashamed… I thought it would be like every other game, recycled graphics. I was wrong, World of Goo is the epitome of ingenuity and class. If I had the oppurtunity again I would gladly pay upwards of 40 for the game, and for world of goo 2 i would pay full retail of 110 dollars the day of its release. Please give me a chance to right my wrong. Make WORLD OF GOO 2

  168. Techno Information » Blog Archive » World of Goo’s Pay What You Want Game Pricing: “Huge Success” Says:

    […] results are in, with 2D Boy reporting the endeavor a huge success. So successful, in fact, that they’re continuing the experiment by extending it until this […]

  169. Brian Says:

    The Selling points for me were:
    * GNU/Linux
    * Pay what you want
    * GNU/Linux Demo
    * User made content (goofans.com)

  170. Mid-week Community Links » GameMaker Blog Says:

    […] have released some interesting statistics from their recent “Pay what you like” offer on World of […]

  171. Citizen Game: The Voice of UK Gaming » Blog Archive » Gooey Goodness Says:

    […] the first birthday of this surreal and wonderful game, 2D Boy decided that they would let gamers pay whatever they wanted for the acclaimed title. Be it $50, $5 or whatever, 2D Boy was just happy to get you to pay and […]

  172. BBB Says:

    I’m sorry if my assessment is harsh but I want to give my opinion. If anything for the proper study of my personal case. So firstly I want to say I’m not a customer.

    Linux support: No question that native Linux support is a big plus in my book.
    Polish: It definitely had the kind of polish that is less common in the states and closer to European or Canadian efforts. Something worth being praised as a step in the right direction.

    The reason I didn’t buy the game? Simply missed the offer and only heard about the results. The last time I felt like I got a fair price for a game though was Katamari Damacy (which I would give a 9/10 as far as how awesome I thought it was). It was $20 and if I put that as a standard I would honestly not pay the same price for World of Goo.

    After playing the demo the game was not interesting to me and I felt I would pay somewhere between $4-$6. So if this offer happens again I might be willing to pay that kind of money even for a game I don’t care for. I’m not rich by any means.

    Observing the graph it seems I’m filling some demographic, but this might help with the specifics. I’m also going to note that it looks like most people agree with my price and if you just make the game $5 I bet you could pitch the game easily to everyone that paid under that price.

  173. BBB Says:

    Also what Dan says covers a flaw we both recognize with the purchase plan:
    “My guess is that many people that paid 0.01$ were just curious, they didn’t bother try the demo before buying
    In fact why try the demo if you can get the game for next to nothing?
    If you liked the game you didn’t even need the effort to uninstall the demo and start again the full game!
    I’m sure that many people out there ended up loving the game and feeling guilty for paying so little for it :)
    So in my opinion it would be better to choose from a set of price option , like : 1 – 2 – 5 -10$ …”

    I think this should really be observed. If you ask me anything below $2 is even insulting. I also think it’s a good place because why go out of your way to pay $2 for a game you might think is crap? So they download the demo to find out if they want more… and forced to properly assess for how much they will pay due to however much you blew them away with the demo.

  174. The Two iPhone App Stores, Lessons from a “Pay What You Want” Sale, Lessons of Failure, and more… | Software by Rob Says:

    […] Lessons from a “Pay What You Want” Software Sale – A key takeaway: “Few people chose their price based on the perceived value of the game.  How much the person feels they can afford seems to play a much larger role in the decision than how much the game is worth.” […]

  175. ThreeLeafIvy Says:

    Conclusion: Humanity in general seems to be cheap.

  176. DL315 Says:

    I purchased a copy because

    1) I am a console gamer, PC games do not appeal to me as much.
    2) D2D was hosting a sale at $5 for the software.
    3) I am unsure of the entertainment value, and it’s not in my genre of preference.

    At the end, $2 to $3 is what I paid for, for a complete unknown. I still have not played it, but I assume it’s the same as most games on Nintendo DS.

  177. The World of Goo Birthday Pricing Experiment | The Reticule Says:

    […] I won’t delve into too much detail, RPS have done their fair share and Ron and Kyle have also provided a lengthy analysis of what has happened so far. […]

  178. Kloonigames » Blog Archive » Happy Birthday Crayon Physics Deluxe Says:

    […] pay what you want sale for the 1 year birthday of World of Goo (most excellent game btw.). In the results of that sale they pointed out that they would like other developers to try this model as well to get a bunch of […]

  179. This Week Only, Pay What You Want for Crayon Physics Deluxe | Ripten Videogame Blog Says:

    […] game pricing models go, the pay-what-you-want idea isn’t new; fellow IGF finalist 2D Boy pioneered the scheme last October with World of Goo. 2D Boy noted that donations of less than 30 cents aren’t much of a […]

  180. What do ye do With a Drunken Pirate? « Gamer Gone Wild Says:

    […] give this particular idea a shot last year.  The most popular example would be 2d Boy’s World of Goo. This is probably not viable for big budget titles, but for an independent developer looking to […]

  181. güzelyurt evden eve nakliyat Says:

    Hi .. There are some email addresses in the text fields which it might be polite to scrub…

  182. Deal: The Humble Game Bundle (Pay what you want for 5 Indie games) - Page 2 - Overclock.net - Overclocking.net Says:

    […] of Goo already did this with their Birthday sale. You can read the results here. The fact is, they lose money on the transactions that small due to having to pay the CC processing […]

  183. SBartsch Says:

    Nice offer – supported!
    Looking forward to play on Linux =)

  184. Monsters are Everywhere » Blog Archive » Indie Game Sales Says:

    […] Ouch.  Add to that a more than 90% drop in sales by 2007 and a different story starts to emerge.Sales Results for 2D Boy’s previous Pay What You Want model for World of Goo.  Again, a different story kind of emerges here, that maybe the pay what you want model has a […]

  185. Lucas Says:

    “One thing that the survey data might suggests is that despite there being a lot discussion around what games are worth and the dollar value of an hour of play, few people chose their price based on the perceived value of the game. How much the person feels they can afford seems to play a much larger role in the decision than how much the game is worth.”

    “Feels” being the key term here.

    I know a lot of my friends justify music/movie/game piracy on the grounds that they’re “totally broke”… yet they’re willing to blow upwards of a hundred bucks on drinks and cabs every weekend.

    People’s purchasing is based on what they feel something is worth. If they give you fifty cents, it’s not worth much to them. Their current financial status probably has very little to do with it. (Honestly, how big of a jump is it from fifty cents to five bucks?)

    I’m not saying broke people don’t exist – I’m just saying that brokeness is overdiagnosed. And primarily self-diagnosed.

    Yes, $20 is a bit high for an indie game. But $0.50 is insultingly low.

  186. The Humble Indie Bundle – Dein Preis – Spielebundle für PC/Mac/Linux | Linux und Ich Says:

    […] ein paar Monaten hat das Indie-Spiele Label 2D-Boy das Spiel World of Goo über eine “Pay What you Want“-Aktion verkauft. Die Aktion scheint so erfolgreich gewesen zu sein, dass man sich nun mit […]

  187. Gamers are spoiled idiots @ Up Up Down Down Says:

    […] US$9.18 turned out to be the average amount people were willing to part with for to own the bundle’s five games. Not a great return on investment for the pack’s US$80 RRP, but it’s been shown before that the income produced from a “pay-what-you-want-model” is mediated by what people can afford rather than perceived value. […]

  188. webadisi Says:

    Hi .. My Names Yusuf Guney .. And I know a lot of my friends justify music/movie/game piracy on the grounds that they’re “totally broke”… yet they’re willing to blow upwards of a hundred bucks on drinks and cabs every weekend…

  189. LookAtMyGame » Blog Archive » Et si on faisait la manche ? Says:

    […] avez du entendre parlé en fin d’année dernière du « Birthday Sales » de 2DBoy sur leur jeu World Of Goo mais aussi plus récemment du « Humble […]

  190. Wolfire Interview | Pc Gaming | Gaming Daily Says:

    […] since 2D Boy’s pay-what you want sale for World of Goo and the Organic Indie Preorder Pack which we put on with the awesome guys at Unknown Worlds, […]

  191. mehmet Says:

    I bought the game before the sale started, but if I had the chance I would
    rather pay 5$ instead of 20$, because of the exchange rate from my counties currency to $. In Poland, where I live, for the value of 20$ I could buy most of the big and popular games on the market. World of Goo is normally available in the broken-drm-window$-only-version for ~8$ – a normal

  192. Farllok Says:

    I love you guys, this is a great experiment.

  193. Facets of BrettW » Motivations II Says:

    […] have the option of explicitly supporting developers. There was an implicit version of this model in 2d Boy’s “Pay-what-you-want” sale, which was a raging success but terribly confronting for some […]

  194. cilt bakımı Says:

    I paid $1. $20 is really meaning a lot to me.

  195. sikiş Says:

    I purchased a copy because

    1) I am a console gamer, PC games do not appeal to me as much.
    2) D2D was hosting a sale at $5 for the software.
    3) I am unsure of the entertainment value, and it’s not in my genre of preference.

    At the end, $2 to $3 is what I paid for, for a complete unknown. I still have not played it, but I assume it’s the same as most games on Nintendo DS.

  196. Tristen Balloon Artist Says:

    Wow. I guess that I shouldn’t be surprised that their wants were, once again, overruled by their monetary abilities. Thanks for the experiment!

  197. takım çaliği Says:

    tnkss for the value of 20$ I could buy most of the big and popular games on the market. World of Goo is normally available in the broken-drm-window$-only-version for ~8$ – a normal

  198. Wes Says:

    Thanks for the post. This is the first I’m hearing of the birthday event. I’m going to have to get my friends to buy this game. It has resuscitated my Wii. Thanks again,

    Wes

  199. film ize Says:

    essons from a “Pay What You Want” Software Sale – A key takeaway: “Few people chose their price based on the perceived value of the game. How much the person feels they can afford seems to play a much larger role in the decision than how much the game is worth….

  200. evdeneve Says:

    I figured would be a fair price given this was supposed to be a discount of sorts and I figured most people would go for the cheap option so the more of that goes to you guys

  201. FingerGaming » Opinion: The Mac App Store And The PC Gamepocalypse - Gaming on the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad Says:

    […] to suggest that the natural price (the price that users want to pay) for games is actually $5. When 2D Boy did an experiment with flexible pricing with World of Goo a couple of years ago, they had players essentially choose what they wanted to pay from across a […]

  202. Kevin Walter Says:

    Great idea for a survey.
    Any chance of a copy of the summary as survey monkey has taken the data down.
    I have quite a few students who would like to discuss this in the dissertations next year.
    Thanks
    Kevin Walter
    University of Gloucestershire
    The Park
    Cheltenham
    GL51 6NW
    UK

  203. Does Pay-What-You-Want Work? | Dealpeg Blog Says:

    […] World of Goo gathered and shared its pay-what-you-want data—huzzah for statistics and transparency! Buyers were also asked why they chose to pay what they did. A plurality indicated it was “all I can afford;” the close second was “I like the pay what you want model and wanted to support it.” […]